My Lab on Missouri Concern

Dogs, dogs and even some cats
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OldDude
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My Lab on Missouri Concern

Post by OldDude »

Arriving in CO next week with my lab for an extended period BPing and doing a few 14ers. He's experienced and in his prime but looking at MO's NW ridge route images 13 and 14 I'm a bit concerned about the crux -- more so coming down. Can't tell but how high is that area needed to ascend and descend? Looks to be to high to jump down, yes? What about going around on the downside? He's 85 lbs and I'm not lifting him. Thx.
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climbingcue
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Re: My Lab on Missouri Concern

Post by climbingcue »

85 lbs is the biggest concern. If he is injured you are not going to be able to carry him down. I personally think the best size hiking dog is 35-45 lbs, big enough to hike but small enough to get them out if they get hurt.
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OldDude
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Re: My Lab on Missouri Concern

Post by OldDude »

climbingcue wrote: Thu Aug 05, 2021 9:43 am 85 lbs is the biggest concern. If he is injured you are not going to be able to carry him down. I personally think the best size hiking dog is 35-45 lbs, big enough to hike but small enough to get them out if they get hurt.
Injury is always a concern but risk we take and I carry the harness in that event. Still want intel on that crux.
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climbingcue
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Re: My Lab on Missouri Concern

Post by climbingcue »

I have been up there 4 times, but never with a dog. It is off camber for a bit, I could see it being tricky for most dogs. I don't know how agile your dog is. Hopefully someone that has had a dog up there will be able to give you a better answer.
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two lunches
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Re: My Lab on Missouri Concern

Post by two lunches »

my dog weighs about half as much as i do- i did not take him through the crux on MO. while he is a better climber than i am (with built in traction) i felt really REALLY uncomfortable guiding him across that super bare scree slope. my responsibility to rescue him in the event of a slide was not worth it to me.
"There’s not heaven to go to because we’re in it already. We’re in hell, too- They coexist right beside each other and God is the land." - Elsa Dutton
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OldDude
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Re: My Lab on Missouri Concern

Post by OldDude »

Appreciate the feedback. I think I'll do MO sans dog. What's you opinion for him on Belford and Oxford via Elkhead pass route -- if it's still there after hearing of slides last week?
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yaktoleft13
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Re: My Lab on Missouri Concern

Post by yaktoleft13 »

Depends on how good of a climber your dog is. My dog had no problems with Missouri's crux (3 years old at the time 55lb, Brittany), but he's a class 3 climber. You know your dog better than anyone, so definitely your call. But if you're wondering if the mountain can be done comfortably by a dog, absolutely
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Re: My Lab on Missouri Concern

Post by supranihilest »

Missouri's south ridge is easier but longer than the standard northwest ridge, consisting of all trail up and over Elkhead Pass, tundra towards Iowa Peak, and then scree and talus going up the ridge. It would be a better alternative for a dog.
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OldDude
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Re: My Lab on Missouri Concern

Post by OldDude »

yaktoleft13 wrote: Thu Aug 05, 2021 10:48 am Depends on how good of a climber your dog is. My dog had no problems with Missouri's crux (3 years old at the time 55lb, Brittany), but he's a class 3 climber. You know your dog better than anyone, so definitely your call. But if you're wondering if the mountain can be done comfortably by a dog, absolutely
He's joined me on the 14 I've done but if you look at the list you'll see they're basically walkups with minimal boulder or climbing required. Stamina and persistence to summit are his strong suits. Redcloud and Sunshine was a loooong day for him prob b/c we did Handies day before. I'll have to make an assessment when the time comes. I'm boarding him for a week in Salida while I do a several I don't want him to deal with -- Harvard-Columbia combo, Challenger-Kit Carson.
teamdonkey
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Re: My Lab on Missouri Concern

Post by teamdonkey »

Harvard & Columbia I absolutely wouldn't bring a dog on. But Missouri really shouldn't be a problem. The move you're talking about shouldn't be bad for a large dog. Worst case scenario is you put him in the harness for a minute. I don't remember if there's a way around it, but generally speaking the route is the route for a reason. The scree slope I wouldn't give a second thought to. With four natural points of contact dogs don't have any trouble with those kinds of things.
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Re: My Lab on Missouri Concern

Post by CORed »

OldDude wrote: Thu Aug 05, 2021 9:38 am Arriving in CO next week with my lab for an extended period BPing and doing a few 14ers. He's experienced and in his prime but looking at MO's NW ridge route images 13 and 14 I'm a bit concerned about the crux -- more so coming down. Can't tell but how high is that area needed to ascend and descend? Looks to be to high to jump down, yes? What about going around on the downside? He's 85 lbs and I'm not lifting him. Thx.
Good point about carrying a dog out. A few decades ago, I made the mistake of taking an old 60 lb. dog on a hike, got several miles in, and he just decided, "I can't do this any more." I was in my twenties at the time, and managed to carry him out (after an unplanned overnight feeding a fire), but now, at 65, I don't think I could do it. My next dog after the one I carried out, was a Lab mix of similar weight, and she could handle pretty much everything I could, up to and including class 3, and was the most cold-tolerant dog I have had. Fortunately, I never had to carry her, but I quit taking her on hikes when she started to show signs of age.
CORed
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Re: My Lab on Missouri Concern

Post by CORed »

teamdonkey wrote: Thu Aug 05, 2021 12:11 pm Harvard & Columbia I absolutely wouldn't bring a dog on. But Missouri really shouldn't be a problem. The move you're talking about shouldn't be bad for a large dog. Worst case scenario is you put him in the harness for a minute. I don't remember if there's a way around it, but generally speaking the route is the route for a reason. The scree slope I wouldn't give a second thought to. With four natural points of contact dogs don't have any trouble with those kinds of things.
As to loose scree slopes or other slippery stuff, I agree that four legs makes them much easier for dogs than for most humans. You do need to be careful about taking them where a loose rock could endanger other hikers though, as a dog simply doesn't understand the need to be careful about that.
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