Advice on alpine touring setup?

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thebeave7
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Re: Advice on alpine touring setup?

Post by thebeave7 »

pvnisher wrote: Fri Nov 25, 2022 10:59 pm
Bean wrote: Fri Nov 25, 2022 8:53 am Something like a Tecton is not appropriate for this use case. Nor are inserts.
How do you figure?
It's his only set of skis and bindings.
Something like Tecton and inserts would be a good purchase since I doubt it's really all about crushing the uphill for fkt.
For me, anyway, I'd rather carry more weight on the uphill and be better set up for the downhill. But I'm not going for speed.
Doesn't have to be that specific binding, of course, but whatever it is, inserts are always appropriate!
Its not just about uphill speed, it's about getting where you want to go and saving energy. Lighter pin bindings are fully capable of skiing almost all terrain just fine, unless the OP is planning on doing some super G racing or dropping big cliffs, why carry the extra weight (seems they mostly want an approach ski, that can generally downhill)? Mostly it comes down to skier ability, and yes the lighter bindings will ski a little different than a downhill binding, learn your setup, and the limiting factor for most of us will be our nerve and ability, not the equipment.

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cottonmountaineering
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Re: Advice on alpine touring setup?

Post by cottonmountaineering »

thebeave7 wrote: Sat Nov 26, 2022 9:28 am
pvnisher wrote: Fri Nov 25, 2022 10:59 pm
Bean wrote: Fri Nov 25, 2022 8:53 am Something like a Tecton is not appropriate for this use case. Nor are inserts.
How do you figure?
It's his only set of skis and bindings.
Something like Tecton and inserts would be a good purchase since I doubt it's really all about crushing the uphill for fkt.
For me, anyway, I'd rather carry more weight on the uphill and be better set up for the downhill. But I'm not going for speed.
Doesn't have to be that specific binding, of course, but whatever it is, inserts are always appropriate!
Its not just about uphill speed, it's about getting where you want to go and saving energy. Lighter pin bindings are fully capable of skiing almost all terrain just fine, unless the OP is planning on doing some super G racing or dropping big cliffs, why carry the extra weight (seems they mostly want an approach ski, that can generally downhill)? Mostly it comes down to skier ability, and yes the lighter bindings will ski a little different than a downhill binding, learn your setup, and the limiting factor for most of us will be our nerve and ability, not the equipment.

Eric
ive heard of tib fibs with the light pin bindings, not sure if people are locking the toe or what
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Re: Advice on alpine touring setup?

Post by pvnisher »

Agreed that ability is better than gear. A good skier is safer then a crappy skier, regardless of the gear.
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Re: Advice on alpine touring setup?

Post by Bean »

pvnisher wrote: Fri Nov 25, 2022 10:59 pm Doesn't have to be that specific binding, of course, but whatever it is, inserts are always appropriate!
It’s his only pair of skis. There’s no reason to go to the trouble and expense of doing inserts.
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Re: Advice on alpine touring setup?

Post by pvnisher »

I guess I just always assume that there's no way someone will stick with just one pair, so might as well future proof yourself for the quiver that will invariably ensue.
Lol.
I mean, how could one pair of skis ever make you happy?!
But yes, if there isn't a future quiver, then it makes no sense.

And also, I was thinking he'd buy touring bindings. Once you make that leap it makes more sense.

I don't use inserts solely to move bindings from ski to ski. I also use them so that one pair of skis can be touring or alpine.
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Re: Advice on alpine touring setup?

Post by Bean »

pvnisher wrote: Sun Nov 27, 2022 8:14 am I guess I just always assume that there's no way someone will stick with just one pair, so might as well future proof yourself for the quiver that will invariably ensue.
Lol.
I mean, how could one pair of skis ever make you happy?!
But yes, if there isn't a future quiver, then it makes no sense.

And also, I was thinking he'd buy touring bindings. Once you make that leap it makes more sense.

I don't use inserts solely to move bindings from ski to ski. I also use them so that one pair of skis can be touring or alpine.
If he decides someday he wants to mix and match his bindings and skis then he can add inserts at that time. No point in doing it before then.
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Re: Advice on alpine touring setup?

Post by Jorts »

Wimyers wrote: Wed Nov 23, 2022 11:01 pm I’m looking to purchase my first AT setup. I’m expecting to stay on the cross country side of touring- not interested in shredding steeps or techy terrain with this setup. I’m mostly looking for an alternative to slowshoeing, hoping for long days in the alpine with high elevation gain. I expect I’ll have more days on firmer spring snow than powder. I was once a mediocre resort skier, but no longer own any ski equipment. Again, more in it for the climbs than the descents. 6’0”, 175 lbs.

Does anyone have advice for me? I figure most people on this page probably have ski habits similar to my ambitions. My preliminary research is leading me to something like https://www.backcountry.com/dynafit-blacklight-pro-ski or https://www.backcountry.com/dynafit-bla ... AcQAvD_BwE? Maybe 172 cm to prioritize uphill performance? Open to any recommendations for other skis/bindings, though! Sale prices, especially.

I’m trying to keep to a moderate budget, ~$1000k for skis and bindings. Found some used Skorpius boots in my size, so that’s settled (unless people have strong negative feelings about those?).
I have a somewhat similar style of skiing to you with regards to prioritizing the uphill.

The blacklights are great. Only demoed a pair once but I like their weight and feel. I've been skiing a pair of Dynafit Denalis for 6 years (99 underfoot)... they were my first pair of skis ever (I came from a splitboarding background). I still use the Denalis in early season. I have the Denalis paired with Speed Radicals and Scarpa Alien RSs (similar to the newer F1LTs).

FWIW, that is my "heavy" non-skimo setup. It is beefy enough to handle anything you encounter in the backcountry. I've skied Deming Drop, s**t for Brains, Cristo, Swan Dive and Straight Arrow in that setup. And the people I ski with ski similar setups. I've crashed enough in that setup and also blown out the heel of one of the bindings with a crash. They release fine. My tibia and fibula and knee ligaments are all still intact.

Good luck. Feel free to PM if you have any questions.
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Re: Advice on alpine touring setup?

Post by Wimyers »

Thanks for the input everyone, this is great info for me. Very helpful and super appreciated. I found some 178cm Scott Superguide 95s for $300, Dynafit Radical bindings for $400, and BD nylon skins for $100. Boots proved trickier, the used ones sold before I could check them out but I did find some Salomon MTN explores for $300. Not exactly what I'm looking for but pretty cheap and not too stiff.
k_fergie wrote: Thu Nov 24, 2022 8:31 am Welcome to the dark side, Will :twisted: :twisted:
Haha, even after I swore I'd never get into it. We should try to get out sometime.
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Re: Advice on alpine touring setup?

Post by SkaredShtles »

Wimyers wrote: Mon Nov 28, 2022 2:26 pm <snip>
Haha, even after I swore I'd never get into it.
What changed your mind? Thing that locked it for me was a spring trip up Grays - we didn't summit, but made it to about 13.4K... the trip back to the vehicle parked at I-70 took 30 minutes. 8)
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Re: Advice on alpine touring setup?

Post by Wimyers »

SkaredShtles wrote: Mon Nov 28, 2022 3:15 pm
Wimyers wrote: Mon Nov 28, 2022 2:26 pm <snip>
Haha, even after I swore I'd never get into it.
What changed your mind? Thing that locked it for me was a spring trip up Grays - we didn't summit, but made it to about 13.4K... the trip back to the vehicle parked at I-70 took 30 minutes. 8)
One too many snowshoe slogs, coupled with adult money. I love getting out in wintery conditions, but snowshoes are just too inefficient. Last spring I climbed a couloir with a buddy who then skied down it in a minute or two while I glissaded behind him. That may have been the singular turning point…

I think the skill level entry barrier is probably the number one thing that has kept me sidelined. I’ve always felt the appeal, but feared I wasn’t a strong enough resort skier. But I hate resort skiing. I once felt a similar way with trad climbing relative gym climbing, but a couple years ago I went for it and taught myself to trad climb, and now I’m onsighting 5.10 trad routes. I think I now have the confidence (arrogance?) to jump into touring and try to figure it out as I go. I’d rather learn by touring easy terrain than either go to resorts or keep sitting out.
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Re: Advice on alpine touring setup?

Post by kwhit24 »

Wimyers wrote: Mon Nov 28, 2022 7:03 pm
SkaredShtles wrote: Mon Nov 28, 2022 3:15 pm
Wimyers wrote: Mon Nov 28, 2022 2:26 pm <snip>
Haha, even after I swore I'd never get into it.
What changed your mind? Thing that locked it for me was a spring trip up Grays - we didn't summit, but made it to about 13.4K... the trip back to the vehicle parked at I-70 took 30 minutes. 8)
One too many snowshoe slogs, coupled with adult money. I love getting out in wintery conditions, but snowshoes are just too inefficient. Last spring I climbed a couloir with a buddy who then skied down it in a minute or two while I glissaded behind him. That may have been the singular turning point…

I think the skill level entry barrier is probably the number one thing that has kept me sidelined. I’ve always felt the appeal, but feared I wasn’t a strong enough resort skier. But I hate resort skiing. I once felt a similar way with trad climbing relative gym climbing, but a couple years ago I went for it and taught myself to trad climb, and now I’m onsighting 5.10 trad routes. I think I now have the confidence (arrogance?) to jump into touring and try to figure it out as I go. I’d rather learn by touring easy terrain than either go to resorts or keep sitting out.
Just to add more info he's my current set up. Everything adds up pretty quick (almost $3,000 in total) but I've been able to utilize deals on different things and have bought them over many years so some versions are out of date. Also many of these have multiple uses but these are some other things to think about

Boots: Scarpa Maestrale RS (2018) https://us.scarpa.com/maestrale-rs-f18 ($500 of FB Marketplace)
Skis: Moment Wildcat Tour 108 (2022 verision) https://www.momentskis.com/products/wildcat-tour-108 ($700)
Skins: Pomoca Climb 2.0 (2019) https://www.pomoca.com/skins/025-climb-2-0 ($100)
Bindings: Salomon Shift Binding 13 (2019) https://www.salomon.com/en-us/shop/prod ... olor=30178 ($320 friend at a shop deal)
Poles: Leki Haute Route 2 (2023) https://www.rei.com/product/214434/leki ... -ski-poles (Don't have yet) ($100)
Pants: Patagucci Powder Bowl (2018) (Then Descentionist no Stormstride) https://www.outdoorgearlab.com/reviews/ ... censionist ($150)
Base Layers: Patagonia Capilene Air Bottoms and Air Hoody (2017-18) https://www.patagonia.com/shop/capilene-baselayers (HUGE Fan! Yuuuuge. I wear these throughout resort and spring ski seasons) ($100 + $100)
Jacket: Patagonia Stormstride (2021) https://www.backcountry.com/patagonia-s ... acket-mens ($240)
Gloves: Salmon MTN Gor-Tex ($85)
Gloves Arc'teryx Venta ($33)
Backpack: Osprey Kamber 32 (2017) https://www.osprey.com/us/en/product/ka ... 1_625.html ($135)
Avy Safety Set: Black Diamond Guide Avy Safety (2019) https://www.blackdiamondequipment.com/e ... afety-set/ ($315)

I knew I want to get into it when I saw a guy and his two dogs ski down Princeton and then I was sold when it only took like 20 min to get down Quandary
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Re: Advice on alpine touring setup?

Post by spoony »

kwhit24 wrote: Tue Nov 29, 2022 8:56 am
Wimyers wrote: Mon Nov 28, 2022 7:03 pm
SkaredShtles wrote: Mon Nov 28, 2022 3:15 pm
What changed your mind? Thing that locked it for me was a spring trip up Grays - we didn't summit, but made it to about 13.4K... the trip back to the vehicle parked at I-70 took 30 minutes. 8)
One too many snowshoe slogs, coupled with adult money. I love getting out in wintery conditions, but snowshoes are just too inefficient. Last spring I climbed a couloir with a buddy who then skied down it in a minute or two while I glissaded behind him. That may have been the singular turning point…

I think the skill level entry barrier is probably the number one thing that has kept me sidelined. I’ve always felt the appeal, but feared I wasn’t a strong enough resort skier. But I hate resort skiing. I once felt a similar way with trad climbing relative gym climbing, but a couple years ago I went for it and taught myself to trad climb, and now I’m onsighting 5.10 trad routes. I think I now have the confidence (arrogance?) to jump into touring and try to figure it out as I go. I’d rather learn by touring easy terrain than either go to resorts or keep sitting out.
Just to add more info he's my current set up. Everything adds up pretty quick (almost $3,000 in total) but I've been able to utilize deals on different things and have bought them over many years so some versions are out of date. Also many of these have multiple uses but these are some other things to think about

Boots: Scarpa Maestrale RS (2018) https://us.scarpa.com/maestrale-rs-f18 ($500 of FB Marketplace)
Skis: Moment Wildcat Tour 108 (2022 verision) https://www.momentskis.com/products/wildcat-tour-108 ($700)
Skins: Pomoca Climb 2.0 (2019) https://www.pomoca.com/skins/025-climb-2-0 ($100)
Bindings: Salomon Shift Binding 13 (2019) https://www.salomon.com/en-us/shop/prod ... olor=30178 ($320 friend at a shop deal)
Poles: Leki Haute Route 2 (2023) https://www.rei.com/product/214434/leki ... -ski-poles (Don't have yet) ($100)
Pants: Patagucci Powder Bowl (2018) (Then Descentionist no Stormstride) https://www.outdoorgearlab.com/reviews/ ... censionist ($150)
Base Layers: Patagonia Capilene Air Bottoms and Air Hoody (2017-18) https://www.patagonia.com/shop/capilene-baselayers (HUGE Fan! Yuuuuge. I wear these throughout resort and spring ski seasons) ($100 + $100)
Jacket: Patagonia Stormstride (2021) https://www.backcountry.com/patagonia-s ... acket-mens ($240)
Gloves: Salmon MTN Gor-Tex ($85)
Gloves Arc'teryx Venta ($33)
Backpack: Osprey Kamber 32 (2017) https://www.osprey.com/us/en/product/ka ... 1_625.html ($135)
Avy Safety Set: Black Diamond Guide Avy Safety (2019) https://www.blackdiamondequipment.com/e ... afety-set/ ($315)

I knew I want to get into it when I saw a guy and his two dogs ski down Princeton and then I was sold when it only took like 20 min to get down Quandary
Some of you probably know this already, but the Black Diamond Guide Transceiver you purchased is subject to a possible recall because it may not switch from send to search mode. See info here: https://www.cpsc.gov/Recalls/2022/Black ... der%20snow.

How do you like the Wildcat Tours? My resort powder ski is the Moment Bibby (the sort-of predecessor of the Wildcat) and it is my favorite ski ever.
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